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We spent a week in Austria at the end of May, and now as we are packing up for a week in Belgium and the Netherlands, I thought I’d share a few photos from our trip to Salzburg. Our close friends from Oregon were camped out in Salzburg for over a month so it gave us the perfect excuse to hop on a short flight to visit them. It was wonderful to see “old” friends.

Kyle and I spent a few days in Salzburg in our early twenties, but I hardly remembered just how magical a city it is. It was a wonderful place to be with the kids. It’s a small enough city that you can cover it easily by foot and there were great park tucked all over the city… plus having kids gave me an excuse to belt out tunes from The Sound of Music all over town.

SALZBURG AUSTRIA TRAVELING WITH KIDSPINTRAVELING SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINSALZBURG AUSTRIA TRAVELING WITH KIDSPINTRAVELING SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINWe spent one big morning taking the cable car up to Untersberg and then hiking the last bit to the top of the mountaintop for a seriously spectacular panoramic view. The kids were all a bit grumpy by the time we made it to the top, but some gummy bear bribery helped. I didn’t take too many photos at the top since we were busy making sure no tiny people tried to ski down from the top.

TRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINWhile we were in Austria, Lulu turned four! We loaded up for her birthday day and took the train to Hallstatt. To get to Hallstatt from Salzburg involved taking a train to a boat to get across the lake to the beautiful little town of Hallstatt. It’s picturesque from the boat, but once you’re in the (adorable) little town you can barely move as their are so many tourists! Kyle and I both hate being in crowds like that, so we made our way out to the edge of town, called a cab, and escaped around the bend to Obertraun. Obertraun was quiet as can be, we had a whole cafe to ourselves with a view of a park. The girls played on the playground and came back for bites of birthday cake now and then. It was a long, lovely day.

TRAVELING WITH KIDS HALLSTATT AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS Obertraun AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS Obertraun AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS Obertraun AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS Obertraun AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS Obertraun AUSTRIAPINWe had a few more days to explore Salzburg, including a visit to the Hohensalzburg Castle, and a couple visits to the Augustiner Bräu (brewery), and a few key Sound of Music tourism spots along the way. A week was the perfect amount of time for our trip, although I wouldn’t have argued about staying another week there.

TRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPINTRAVELING WITH KIDS SALZBURG AUSTRIAPIN

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We have four pages filled with places we’d like to see in England alone. There is so much to do and so much to see. We are countryside people, and our adventures tend to take us further out away from London and into the lush green countryside. It’s so picturesque that I can hardly stop myself from gasping and grabbing for my camera; the soft rolling hills, the bleating sheep and lambs that speckle them, the yellow flowers that cover vast areas of farmland creating a bright ochre blanket that spans for miles. We always take backroads and find that adding ten minutes to our drive frequently results in magical views and “pull the car over!” moments.

Mostly we’ve been traveling close by where we are living in Berkshire. We spent one Saturday exploring Tisbury and Shaftesbury, including a wonderful countryside walk (my favorite thing about England), and an incredibly lunch at The Beckford Arms. Country walks on public footpaths take you through fields of sheep, into bright green woods, and across little bridges. Every place we go, I don’t want to leave. I find myself looking wistfully in the review mirror as we drive away, longing to go back.

trip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINtrip to tisbury shaftesbury englandPINThe following weekend, after our trip to Tisbury and Shaftesbury, we loaded up for another day trip to the Cotswolds. This time we knew to call ahead to book a table at a popular pub called The Fox at Oddington, and we headed straight there to eat before we explored Upper and Lower Slaughter. The two small villages are connected by a walking path that was perfect for the kids.

THE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPINTHE COTSWOLDS TRAVELING ENGLANDPIN

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We adore Freshly Picked shoes. I’ve been collaborating with this company since Gigi was a tiny tot. Here’s what I love about their shoes and moccasins: the kids can put them on themselves, they’re lightweight which makes them comfortable for the kids, and easy for me to bring along as an alternative pair when they get sick of wearing their rainboots/their boots get wet and muddy, and they come in a million wonderful colors and designs which the girls love to chose from.

The girls picked out three new pairs – one pair for each of the girls ,and one for their baby brother. Gigi, who is very into Star Wars lately picked herself a black pair because, “That’s what Princess Leia would choose.”, Lulu chose a sparkly pair called Merci because, “They’re sparkly like the Eiffel Tower!”, and the girls chose the silly B-A-N-A-N-A-S pair for Roux because they’re awesome.

freshly picked moccasinsPINfreshly picked moccasinsPINfreshly picked moccasinsPINfreshly picked moccasinsPINfreshly picked moccasinsPINfreshly picked moccasinsPINI’m teaming up with Freshly Picked to give away a pair. You can enter by leaving a comment here on the blog, and enter over on Instagram. *U.S. ONLY

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  • Katie Sordahl - I LOVE the silly B-A-N-A-N-A-S, so cute! I will be checking them out for my little one or sure. Or maybe if we are lucky win a pair :).ReplyCancel

  • Clarissa - I absolutely adore their new urban moccasins!!ReplyCancel

  • Sarah - they are the cutest shoes! They look so comfortable and versatileReplyCancel

  • Ashley - I love how comfy these shoes look for babe! My little one will start walking soon and I definitely want some cute soft soles for her to toddle around in!ReplyCancel

Springtime in the English countryside has been absolutely spectacular. It feels reminiscent of our home in the Pacific Northwest weather-wise, and we’ve been taking full advantage of every “partly sunny” day. This week has settled in with a bit of rain and a biting breeze so we’re sipping tea, spring cleaning, and catching up on all sorts of things. You would think that, having moved away from all our stuff, we wouldn’t have anything to spring clean. But nine months into our time here and we have a garage filled with things for donation. We recently discovered that the local church where we go to nature journal, explore, and picnic is where three of the original Salvation Army founders are buried which makes me hopeful that I can find a Salvation Army soon to donate a lot of our accumulated stuff on to.

At the start of April we met our friends from Oxford for something called Lambing Weekend which seems to be a popular thing around here, and I can see why. It essentially involved spending a few hours wandering around a local farm petting and holding baby lambs, admiring piglets, buying some early spring vegetables from the farm shop, eating food and drinking coffee. I could do this every single weekend and never tire of it, which leads me to believe that my long harbored dream of having a little farm of my own is something I should seriously pursue.

SPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINSPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINSPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINSPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINSPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINSPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINSPRING LAMBING WEEKEND ENGLANDPINRight now things feel so good here; something I doubted would happen in the first months we spent trying to settle in. The list of frustrations and things we miss is slowly fading, and the list of things we love and are going to miss is growing steadily. The girls do ballet and gymnastics, we do our homeschool work, and we try to get out and adventure every weekend. We have started playing with watercolor painting, and we are quickly becoming avid nature journalers. In the midst of our activities Baby Roux keeps growing (far too quickly), Gigi keeps loosing teeth and slowly transforming into a proper kid, and Lulu keeps being Lulu – that is to say a feisty, magical, hilarious tot-kid.

ENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINENGLAND SPRINGPINMy Mom and her boyfriend came to visit mid-April for a week and it was wonderful to have family around! We had a wonderful time inviting them into our home, hosting meals, and showing them around our favorite places. We spend most of our time here walking around lakes, wandering footpaths, checking in on the local cows, staring at Roux, and picnicking at our favorite little local church so we brought them along on all of those activities. My Mom is a wonderful watercolor painter and she brought the girls watercolor “crayons” and small watercolor journals which they love. When we’re out and about they draw in them, and then paint over their drawings with water when we get home. She did some watercolor lessons with the girls during the day, and some with me at night after the kids were in bed, and helped me pick out some quality watercolor supplies for my new hobby.

spring in englandPINspring in englandPINnature journalingPINnature journalingPINspring in englandPINspring in englandPINspring in englandPINspring in englandPINnature journaling spring in englandPINnature journaling spring in englandPINspring in englandPINspring in englandPINspring in englandPINThe month of May shows no signs of slowing down. Kyle is hard at work and we’re trying to form and keep a balance of everyone’s needs. We have a trip to Salzburg, Austria planned where we’ll get to spend some wonderful days in the company of good friends from back home. Lulu will turn four this month, Roux will be five months old, and I’ll be trying not to cry over how fast they’re growing up. With life flying by, I’m finding it hard to carve out time to write here, but you can follow along on Instagram too, where I keep things more up to date and in the moment.

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I keep meaning to share this recipe, but every day everyday life seems to pull me in several different directions, often at the same time. Then, before I have a chance to sit down and focus on any given project, I find that it’s 7:30pm and the kids are in bed and all I can muster energy for is scrolling through the maddening Netflix homepage trying to find something to watch. But tonight, here I am at nearly 8:00pm and the house is mostly quiet. I can hear the girls playing with their dolls in bed and I’m alone in the living room with a glass of red wine, and stormy spring clouds filling what I can see of the sky above the identical brick houses and tall trees outside the front window. Maybe it’s because I’m still a little hungry, or maybe because it’s cozy and quiet, but here I am finally ready to tell you about my adventures with cauliflower.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINIt might seem that those two words: “adventures” and “cauliflower”, don’t really belong together. But I’m here to tell you that they do. I never ate cauliflower before we moved to England; it was not even on my radar. I can’t remember my mom ever cooking it when I was younger. I think the few times I had it as a child it had been practically boiled into a bland paste, or served like sad white cardboard alongside the flashy cherry tomatoes and dull-but-safe baby carrots on a grocery-store-assembled vegetable platter. I may have braved a piece here or there but it wasn’t until the last few years that I started to become more aware of its’ possibilities.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINIt’s no secret that my cooking experience here has been filled with the challenges of learning new names for ingredients, cooking temperatures, a spiteful convection oven, and mostly packaged and precut vegetables. But, back in the fall, we went to a farm shop on the last day it was open before closing for the fall and winter. We wandered around with a pitchfork in search of anything we could pull from the ground and take home to cook. We ended up with a few end of the season carrots, beets, and a head of cauliflower. The cauliflower didn’t look particularly appealing or special, but it wasn’t sealed in plastic, and it was something I suspected I could prepare fairly easily given the stand off I was having with the oven, and the limited cooking equipment we’d purchased.

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINThe cauliflower sat on the counter for a couple of days, looking a bit sad and lonely. I felt for the cauliflower because, at the time, I felt quite like the cauliflower. I picked it up and started to pull away the leaves from the slightly waxy core. I pruned the florets from the stalk and cut them into smaller pieces. I tossed them on a sheet pan with olive oil, flake salt, and freshly ground pepper, then I opened the oven and said a little prayer that it wouldn’t turn them into lumps of coal, and closed the door. They roasted, I tossed them, they roasted a bit more. I decided it was time to pull them from the oven when they were significantly caramelized, their centers were tender and their edges crisp and almost burnt.

I divided them into bowls, sprinkled the lot with a little more flake salt, and topped them with a frizzled edged olive oil fried egg. From that humble and very simple beginning, my roasting sheet has seen a lot of cauliflower action. I’ve attempted to pull together my favorite roasted cauliflower recipes below. These recipes would do well topped with a fried or poached egg, tossed with pasta, or on their own. Also, it should be noted that each of these recipes sound like a lot, but the vegetables cook down so much that each recipe will serve two adults. I don’t recommend trying to double them as that will cause the vegetables to steam rather than roast properly!

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER – FIVE VARIATIONS

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH FENNEL, GARLIC, ONION, AND HERBS DE PROVENCE

Ingredients.
1 large head of cauliflower, trimmed and chopped into small pieces
1 yellow onion, halved and sliced pole to pole
1 bulb fennel, trimmed and sliced
1 teaspoon herbs de Provence
2 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
extra virgin olive oil
flake salt
freshly ground black pepper

Directions.
Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Toss the chopped vegetables with about 1/4 cup olive oil, season with salt, pepper, and herbs de Provence. Spread onto a roasting sheet and bake for 30-45 minutes, until the vegetables are caramelized and crispy. Season to taste, and serve immediately.

 

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH ROASTED GARLIC

Ingredients.
1 large head of cauliflower, trimmed and chopped into small pieces
6 cloves of garlic, unpeeled
extra virgin olive oil
flake salt
freshly ground black pepper

Directions.
Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Toss the cauliflower and garlic cloves with a couple tablespoons of olive oil, season with salt and pepper. Spread onto a roasting sheet and bake for 30-45 minutes, until the vegetables are caramelized and crispy. Carefully peel the garlic cloves and toss them with the cauliflower. Season to taste, and serve immediately.

 

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH FENNEL, ONION, ZUCCHINI, AND PARMESAN

Ingredients.
1 large head of cauliflower, trimmed and chopped into small pieces
1 medium zucchini, quartered and chopped
1 red or yellow onion, halved and sliced pole to pole
1 bulb fennel, trimmed and sliced
freshly grated Parmesan
extra virgin olive oil
flake salt
freshly ground black pepper 0r red pepper flakes

Directions.
Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Toss the chopped vegetables with about 1/4 cup olive oil, salt and either black or red pepper. Spread onto a roasting sheet and bake for 20 minutes. Toss with 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan, and roast for another 15-25 minutes, until the vegetables are caramelized and crispy. Sprinkle with a bit more Parmesan. Season to taste, and serve immediately.

 

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH FENNEL, CHORIZO, AND MANCHEGO

Ingredients.
1 large head of cauliflower, trimmed and chopped into small pieces
1 bulb fennel, trimmed and sliced
1/2 cup diced chorizo sausage
shaved Manchego cheese
extra virgin olive oil
flake salt

Directions.
Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Toss the chopped vegetables with a few tablespoons of olive oil, and a pinch of salt. Spread onto a roasting sheet and bake for 30 minutes. Toss in the chorizo, and continue to roast for another 10-15 minutes, until the vegetables are caramelized and crispy. Top with shaved Manchego. Season to taste, and serve immediately.

 

ROASTED CAULIFLOWER - FIVE RECIPESPINROASTED CAULIFLOWER WITH RED ONION, ZUCHINNI, AND GORGONZOLA

Ingredients.
1 large head of cauliflower, trimmed and chopped into small pieces
1 red onion, halved and sliced pole to pole
7oz lardons (or bacon thinly sliced)
4oz crumbled Gorgonzola
extra virgin olive oil
flake salt
freshly ground black pepper

Directions.
Preheat the oven to 425ºF. Toss the chopped vegetables with a drizzle of olive oil, and the bacon, and season with a pinch of pepper and salt.* Spread onto a roasting sheet and bake for 30-45 minutes, tossing often, until the vegetables and bacon are caramelized and crispy. Sprinkle with the Gorgonzola. Season to taste, and serve immediately.

*Alternatively you can toss the vegetables with a couple tablespoons of olive oil and roast them, while cooking the bacon in a pan on the stovetop, draining it, and tossing it together at the end – this is definitely more healthy as you use olive oil for the veggies to roast in, rather than bacon fat.

PRINTABLE RECIPE.
ROASTED CAULIFLOWER

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